Lessons Learned for the Care Provider Team (Part 2 of 2)

…continued

The GP recently modified a prescription given by the nephrologist and changed the dosage of Sophie’s blood pressure medication. Even though Sophie’s grandson knows what medications she has, he is not sure that she is actually taking them.

Sophie and her grandson live together. Grandson works during the day and is frequently out in the evening. Grandson cooks dinner for Sophie when he is home in the evening.

It took the combination of Sophie’s grandson, two daughters and daughter-in-law to piece together information about Sophie as to what was happening at home and with her care providers. In the end, Sophie was fine and her medications were adjusted to avoid this situation happening again.

What my friend learned from this event is as follows:
1. Perhaps more than one person should be on the health care directive, either acting together or as an alternate.
2. The health care directive should be reviewed more frequently and discussion should include Sophie and her family. (Sophie’s health care directive was executed 20 years old.)
3. The health care proxy should be able to be contacted and available. The proxy was unavailable for some time.
4. The family needs to develop a plan for Sophie’s care.
5. Someone needs to monitor Sophie’s medications and set up the medical alert bracelet.
6. The family needs to discuss the role of the grandson in living with Sophie.
7. Communication among family members and organization of Sophie’s care is an ongoing responsibility.

Kris L. Maser
Attorney at Law

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